I have a great passion for classic films, classic Hollywood, and history. I love art, fashion from the late 1800s until the 1960s, and old photography.
My other tumblrs: These-Modern-Times, Classic Films on Review. My movie blog unecinephile.blogspot.com

26th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Joan Fontaine is a BAMF with 46 notes

hildy-johnson:

His Girl Friday + Text Post Meme

Tagged: His Girl FridayCary GrantRosalind RussellHildy Johnson

Source: hildy-johnson

25th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Myrna's Cake with 65 notes

UNDERRATED ACTRESSES: 1/? →  JEAN ARTHUR

Gladys Georgianna Greene (October 17, 1900 - June 19, 1991)
Nominated for best actress in 1943 for The More the Merrier, Jean Arthur was one of the most overlooked actresses in the business. She changed her name to Jean Arthur, inspired by two great heroes, King Arthur and Jeanne d’Arc (Joan of Arc). Jean had a high pitch voice that was hidden for seven years after her film debut until her first talkie in 1929. Her voice almost kept her from being casted in bigger roles, but her acting was irresistible. She was so irresistible that she was one of the leading contenders for the role of Scarlett O’Hara in Gone With the Wind. She did a screen test in 1938 for the film, but was soon turned down and was followed by a test from Joan Bennett and then Vivien Leigh. This allowed Jean to accept another film offer starring Jimmy Stewart called Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Arthur was known as being reclusive because she suffered from stage fright, and she refused to do interviews… “Quite frankly, I’d rather have my throat slit.”. Often stated as The Actress Nobody Knew, Jean Arthur was not only a screwball legend, she was a brilliant actress with unmistakable talent. Her most famous roles are in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and You Can’t Take it With You (1938). Jean Arthur, in my opinion, deserved more recognition than what she received…
“I guess I became an actress because I didn’t want to be myself.” - Jean Arthur

i could watch Jean Arthur movies all day. i adore her

Tagged: Jean Arthur

25th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Hepburn & Hepburn with 1,376 notes

Favorite Films: Gilda (1946)

Tagged: GildaRita HayworthGlenn FordFilm Noir

Source: normajeanebaker

25th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Have you any fire? with 280 notes

Favorite Films: The Women (1939)

Tagged: The Women1939Norma ShearerRosalind RussellPaulette GoddardJoan FontaineJoan Crawford

Source: normajeanebaker

24th August 2014

Photo reblogged from gatabella with 69 notes

gatabella:

"The first impression you had of Ava was that she was so beautiful. She would do her hair with toothpicks from the olives in martinis and it would look great. She could walk out of a hotel without makeup, wearing flats, one of those kilt-type skirts with a big safety pin in it and a simple peasant blouse and she looked gorgeous. She had an ability to find the key light, the one that made her look the best. She even told me once:"When I’m in a room, I know how to find that light." My wife and I were in Madrid with her once, and the sun hit her face just so, and we both said simultaneously, "Ava, you’re too beautiful."And she said, "Oh, shit, I’m sick of hearing that."- Stephen Birmingham

gatabella:

"The first impression you had of Ava was that she was so beautiful. She would do her hair with toothpicks from the olives in martinis and it would look great. She could walk out of a hotel without makeup, wearing flats, one of those kilt-type skirts with a big safety pin in it and a simple peasant blouse and she looked gorgeous. She had an ability to find the key light, the one that made her look the best. She even told me once:"When I’m in a room, I know how to find that light." My wife and I were in Madrid with her once, and the sun hit her face just so, and we both said simultaneously, "Ava, you’re too beautiful."And she said, "Oh, shit, I’m sick of hearing that."

- Stephen Birmingham

Tagged: Ava Gardner

24th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from si je puis with 361 notes

Lines line these are the reasons why I love pre-code films so much

Tagged: Marlene DietrichBlonde VenusPre-Code

Source: hedda-hopper

24th August 2014

Photo reblogged from with 167 notes

perfectlymarilynmonroe:

Marilyn photographed by Manfred Kreiner, 1959.

perfectlymarilynmonroe:

Marilyn photographed by Manfred Kreiner, 1959.

Tagged: Marilyn Monroe

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from La Femme Invisible Merveilleuse with 23 notes

lapitiedangereuse:

Ava Gardner Film The Killers,1946

lapitiedangereuse:

Ava Gardner Film The Killers,1946

Tagged: Ava GardnerThe KillersKitty CollinsFilm Noir

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from Bizarre Los Angeles: The Movie Page with 53 notes

bizarrelosangeles:



"I’m not a femme fatale but when it comes to having to work at being an actress and having a career, it does seem that I’m a fated femme." — Ava Gardner.

bizarrelosangeles:

"I’m not a femme fatale but when it comes to having to work at being an actress and having a career, it does seem that I’m a fated femme." — Ava Gardner.

Tagged: Ava Gardner

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from In Love With the Classics with 67 notes

avasgal:

"No one else could have given the part the sensitivity, the bruised quality that Ava imparted to it…She had to cut out drinking, the late nights and too much Frankie. She had disciplined herself rigorously for the part. She could always do this if she believed in the role, and she believed her part as Cynthia. Sometimes she would come in grumbling in the morning—she hated to get up early and drive to the studio. Once she was actually on the floor, she worked with a kind of desperate involvement and intensity that amazed me." 
-Henry King, director of The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952)

avasgal:

"No one else could have given the part the sensitivity, the bruised quality that Ava imparted to it…She had to cut out drinking, the late nights and too much Frankie. She had disciplined herself rigorously for the part. She could always do this if she believed in the role, and she believed her part as Cynthia. Sometimes she would come in grumbling in the morning—she hated to get up early and drive to the studio. Once she was actually on the floor, she worked with a kind of desperate involvement and intensity that amazed me."

-Henry King, director of The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952)

Tagged: Ava GardnerThe Snows of KilimanjaroGregory Peck